CLINT LORANCE

1st Lieutenant, U.S. Army

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

About Clint

How Long Was Clint With The Platoon?


Clint was assigned to take charge of the platoon just three (3) days prior to the incident.

Clint replaced the previous Platoon Leader who was medically evacuated when an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blew up and caused him to suffer peppering shrapnel wounds to the eyes, face, and abdomen.

Clint had little time to establish a rapport with the member of his platoon before the incident with the Taliban motorcycle riders and the members of his platoon being charged wtih murder.




If Not For This, Would Clint Have Been Promoted to Captain?


YES The US Army Captain Section Board, which conviened on April 9, 2013, recommended Clint be promoted to Captain. Had it not been for this unjust Court Martial and conviction, Clint would still be honorably serving our Nation. ( click for memo)




Does Clint Accept Responsibility For His Actions?


YES To this day, Clint accepts full responsibility for his actions as well as those of his Paratroopers. When asked, Clint said, "If anyone has to go to Prison, it should be me, as the Officer on the ground.” In Court, Clint stood and said, "I TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACTIONS OF MY MEN”




Where is Clint Now?


PRISON

Clint is presentlin in prison, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He has been there for the past 5 years and has another 14 years to serve.




Who is Clint?


Clint Allen Lorance is a hard-working, dedicated, and conscientious leader who, as a First Lieutenant in the US Army in August 2013, was unjustly found guilty on two counts of second-degree murder and one count of attempted murder for ordering his platoon to open fire on three men on a motorcycle in southern Afghanistan in July 2012. He is presently confined in the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Clint was born on December 13, 1984 to Tracy Allen Lorance, a welder, and Anna Monroe Lorance, a homemaker, in Hobart, Oklahoma. They later moved to Greenville, Texas, where Clint was raised. Clint is a middle child with two older sisters and one younger brother and a female cousin, Jamie, who was born the same year as Clint and is considered, by his family, to be his "twin." Clint is also a loving uncle to several nephews and nieces. During high school, Clint worked three jobs simultaneously and was a Police Explorer. Clint also stayed active in the local Future Farmers of America chapter and was fortunate to interact with many adults who helped mentor and nurture him, including the Vice President of the local bank, the Agriculture Education teacher, a Police Officer, and his Aunt and Uncle. All of whom helped shape his perspectives of hard work and service. ​​ In 2002, Clint earned his GED and started classes together at the local community college. However, after one semester, as our Nation prepared for war with Iraq, Clint decided it was time to pitch in and do what he could to help shoulder shoulder the burden of engaging in two wars simultaneously. On December 13, 2002, Clint's 18th birthday, Clint walked into the Army recruiting station in Greenville, Texas, and joined the army as a military policeman (MP). On April 15, 2003, Clint shipped off to basic training at Fort Leonardwood, Missouri, where he spent 17 weeks training to be an Army MP. Upon graduating from basic training and Advanced Individual Training (AIT), Clint spent a few weeks home with his family before shipping off to his first duty assignment in Pusan, South Korea. During his assignment in Korea, Clint was quickly promoted and placed in positions of greater responsibility. Additionally, Clint's outstanding performance and commitment to excellence in each position he held, from Driver to Gunner to Team Leader to Squad Leader to Traffic Accident Investigator and D.A.R.E. School Resource Officer, earned him several accolades for his outstanding performance, from "Soldier of the Month" to "NCO of the Quarter" for the 8th MP Brigade. Clint also achieved the rank of Sergeant in just two years. ​​ In addition to his professional development, Clint maintained his physical fitness. He participated in numerous athletic events to include half marathons, "Iron Soldier" competitions, the "Army 10-Miler" and the "Bataan Memorial Death March" in White Sands, New Mexico. On September 10, 2005, Clint left Korea for his next duty assignment with the 4th Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska. However, since he was being assigned to an airborne infantry unit, prior to checking in, Clint went to the United States Army Airborne School – widely known as "Jump School" – at Fort Benning, Georgia, to attend basic paratrooper training and earn his "wings." While with the 4th Brigade Combat Team, Clint, a 21 year old Sergeant, led a squad of 11 MPs to one of the largest multinational military exercises in which the United States participates, "Cobra Gold" in Thailand. While in Thailand, Clint also earned his Thai Jump Wings. ​​ In September 2006, Clint deployed to Iraq with the 4th Brigade Combat Team for his first operational 12-month operational tour to in a combat zone. That tour was ultimately extended into a 15-month deployment. Upon returning from Iraq, due to his maturity and professionalism while deployed, Clint was selected to be the Brigade's Provost Sergeant, the sergeant in charge the MP station, a position normally held by a more senior ranking non-commissioned officer. He held that position until he was accepted into the "Green-to-Gold" program, which selects exemplary enlisted soldiers and assigns them to a commissioned officer training program with the US Army's Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). In July 2008, Clint left Alaska to attend the University of North Texas and to commence his training to become a Commissioned Officer. While attending university, in addition to maintaining his grades and excelling as a ROTC cadet, Clint was active in the American Red Cross, Denton Chapter, and the Phi Alpha Delta Pre-Law Fraternity. On May 15, 2010, Clint became the first person in his family to graduate with a college degree. Clint was subsequently commissioned as an Infantry Second Lieutenant in in the US Army and proceeded to Fort Benning, Georgia, where he successfully completed Infantry Basic Officer Leader's Course and Air Assault School before being assigned to the 82nd Airborne Division. In March of 2012, Clint deployed to Southern Afghanistan as the Squadron Liaison Officer to the Commander for the 4th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. In June, 2012, Clint was selected to replace an Infantry Platoon Leader who was medically evacuated dues to shrapnel wounds to his eyes, face, and abdomen incurred from the blast of an IED. ​​ Three days after taking charge as the Platoon Leader, on July 2, 2012,Clint directed the men of his platoon to open fire on three Afghan males speeding toward his platoon on a motorcycle. ​​ Just after a year later, Clint was convicted of two counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. ​​ Clint, now 33, is in his fifth year of a 19-year prison sentence at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. .





About The Prosecutors

Did They Have Access To "Biometric" Data?


YES The prosecution could have readily compared the "biometric" data of those who were shot (fingerprint and DNA evidence) and using "forensics" compared it to that data the US government maintains in "biometric" databases in Afghanistan. WHAT IS "BIOMETRICS?" "Biometrics" is the measuring and analysis of physical human attributes. U.S. forces constantly collect fingerprints, DNA, iris images, and facial images, and store this data in local and national databases. This data can be easily searched and compared to other collected "biometric" data. It is used primarily for identification or verification of an individuals. Fingerprints and DNA are examples of biometrics which can be easily collected directly from a detained, willing, or deceased individual. US Government maintained "biometric" databases are used dozens of times an hour throughout Afghanistan to plan missions, target the enemy, authorize access to Coalition installations, and as part of “information operations” and “mapping the population” in order to reliably discern truly innocent civilians from the enemy during counter-insurgency (“COIN”) operations. WHAT IS FORENSICS? Forensics is the scientific testing or techniques used in connection with the detection of a crime or an event.
Using forensic processes such as lifting a latent fingerprint or collecting DNA from materials or evidence found through the examination of IED components after an explosion can result in identifying "biometric" data. Through exploitation of these types of biometrics, individual identification and possible attribution can be made. Forensics can also be used to conduct chemical or materials analysis of IED components to determine their possible association with other events and individuals and to establish the facts surrounding an incident.
For more information, please refer to the "Commander’s Guide to Biometrics in Afghanistan," (CALL 11-25) a US Government publication from the Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL).




What Did They Say Clint Did Wrong?


THE PROSECUTORS CLAIM CLINT KILLED "CIVILIANS"

The prosecution claimed Clint gave an order to kill "civilians" who posed no threat to the platoon and convicted Clint of two counts of murder of "a male of Afghan descent" and one count of attempted murder of "a male of Afghan descent."

This was because a member of Clint's platoon believed he recognized one of the deceased motorcycle riders as a village elder, which made the case civilian casualty case (CIVCAS) and the prosecutors failed to account for the fact that Clint relied on his soldier’s correct assessment of the ROEs which determination the riders on the motorcycle were each a threat not simply a "civilian" or "male of Afghan descent."




Did They Prove "Civilians" Were Shot?


NO

The prosecution never proved the members of Clint's platoon shot at or killed "civilians."

As a matter of fact, the prosecution concealed the identities of those who were shot.

NAMES CROSSED OUT:

The prosecution crossed out the names of those were shot on Clint's Charge Sheet, identifying them each as simply "a male of Afgan descent."

EVIDENCE WITHHELD:

The prosecution withheld "biometric" data (fingerprints and DNA), evidence of those who were shot which was an identical match with fingerprints and DNA from skin cells left on IED components found at GRID coordinates were US personnel had previously been killed.

In other words, the prosecution withheld evidence which proves those who were shot were not "civilians," they were enemy combatants.




Did They Interview the Previous Platoon Leader Who Was Wounded?


YES

The prosecutors interviewed 1LT Latino, the previous Platoon Leader to see if he would have given the same orders Clint gave.


This was the Platoon Leader Clint replaced after he was medically evacuated due to receiving peppering shrapnel wounds to his eyes, face, and abdomen.

Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (VB-IED)

In a sworn statement, 1LT Latino wrote he would never let a motorcycle get close to his platoon because of the known danger associated with Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (VB-IED) and know enemy tactics.

However, somebody lined out that portion of 1LT Latino's statement.





Did They Present All the Evidence to The Jury?


NO Clint's case was not a trial of all the facts available to the prosecution. 1. CLINT ORDERED THE ENGAGEMENT ON OUR ENEMY, NOT "CIVILIANS" Clint believed he ordered his "gun truck" to engage our enemy. The prosecution said he killed "civilians." After his court-martial, Clint retained a new team of attorneys and investigators who learned that prosecutors did not disclose evicence which would have cleared Clint of any wrong-doing - "biometric data" (fingerprint and DNA evidence). This evidence shows conclusively that Clint's platoon did not kill "civilians," as the prosecution claimed, but rather, they killed enemy bomb-makers who had previously left their fingerprints and skin cells on improvised explosive device (IED) components which killed and maimed US Soldiers on the Afghan battlefield.
2. CLINT'S OREDERS SAVED US LIVES Prosecutors withheld from Clint's attorneys, and the Jury, a “significant activity report” (“SIGACT”) which the US Army created about Clint's engagement with the motorcycle riders and others, just 30 days after the incident. The report stated Clint’s platoon was being "scouted for an impending ambush/attack,” and at least one “insurgent killed-in-action confirmed." In other words, Clint's split-second decision and orders prevented an attack on his platoon and saved his Soldier's lives. 3. WITNESSES NOT HELD ACCOUNTABLE AND ORDERED TO TESTIFY The jury never knew that witnesses against Clint were themselves initially accused of murder, given immunity from prosecution (they would not be held responsible) ... and were ordered to cooperate with prosecutors. 4. PREVIOUS LEADER WOULD NEVER ALLOW MOTORCYCLES NEAR PLATOON The Jury never saw a critical portion of a sworn written statement made by the previous Platoon Leader, who Clint replaced after he was medically evacuated due to peppering shrapnel wounds to the eyes, face, and abdomen in a previous IED attack. Before the statement was disclosed to Clint’s trial defense attorneys, someone had lined out the portion of his statement in which the previous Platoon Leader wrote he would never allow motorcycles to get near his platoon for fear of an explosion – the very reason Clint’s soldier initially fired on the threat, and the very reason Clint gave the order to fire to his overwatch "gun truck."





About "Biometrics"

But, Clint Wasn't Aware of the "Biometric" Data Before Giving the Order, Right?


YES

Clint relied on his Paratrooper’s correct assessment of the threat which was consistant with the Rules Of Engagement (ROEs) prior to giving the order.

However, the use of the "biometric" data confirms those who were shot were not "civilians," as the prosecution claimed, and confirms Clint made the right call, at the right time, for the right reasons.




Is "Biometric" Data Admissible at Trial?


YES

Not only is it admissible, the prosecution has a legal responsibility to present this information to Clint's attorney, especially when they claim Clint ordered the killing of "civilians."

The "biometric" data (fingerprints and DNA), previously left on bombs which were used to harm US personnel, proves those who were killed were enemy combatants, not innocent "civilians."

If our Paratroopers killed enemy combatants, what we train and expect our Paratroopers to do in Afghanistan, they cannot be convicted of murder or attempted murder, so long as their actions are consistent with the Rules Of Engagement (ROEs) -- which in this case, they were.




Did Prosecutors Have Access To "Biometric" Data?


YES The prosecution could have readily compared the "biometric" data of those who were shot (fingerprint and DNA evidence) and using "forensics" compared it to that data the US government maintains in "biometric" databases in Afghanistan.




What is "Biometrics" and "Forensics?"


"BIOMETRICS" "Biometrics" is the measuring and analysis of physical human attributes. U.S. forces constantly collect fingerprints, DNA, iris images, and facial images, and store this data in local and national databases. This data can be easily searched and compared to other collected "biometric" data. It is used primarily for identification or verification of an individuals. Fingerprints and DNA are examples of biometrics which can be easily collected directly from a detained, willing, or deceased individual. US Government maintained "biometric" databases are used dozens of times an hour throughout Afghanistan to plan missions, target the enemy, authorize access to Coalition installations, and as part of “information operations” and “mapping the population” in order to reliably discern truly innocent civilians from the enemy during counter-insurgency (“COIN”) operations. FORENSICS Forensics is the scientific testing or techniques used in connection with the detection of a crime or an event.
Using forensic processes such as lifting a latent fingerprint or collecting DNA from materials or evidence found through the examination of IED components after an explosion can result in identifying "biometric" data. Through exploitation of these types of biometrics, individual identification and possible attribution can be made. Forensics can also be used to conduct chemical or materials analysis of IED components to determine their possible association with other events and individuals and to establish the facts surrounding an incident.
For more information, please refer to the "Commander’s Guide to Biometrics in Afghanistan," (CALL 11-25) a US Government publication from the Center for Army Lessons Learned (CALL).




Was All The Evidence Presented to The Jury?


NO Clint's case was not a trial of all the facts available to the prosecution. 1. CLINT ORDERED THE ENGAGEMENT ON OUR ENEMY, NOT "CIVILIANS" Clint believed he ordered his "gun truck" to engage our enemy. The prosecution said he killed "civilians." After his court-martial, Clint retained a new team of attorneys and investigators who learned that prosecutors did not disclose evicence which would have cleared Clint of any wrong-doing - "biometric data" (fingerprint and DNA evidence). This evidence shows conclusively that Clint's platoon did not kill "civilians," as the prosecution claimed, but rather, they killed enemy bomb-makers who had previously left their fingerprints and skin cells on improvised explosive device (IED) components which killed and maimed US Soldiers on the Afghan battlefield.
2. CLINT'S OREDERS SAVED US LIVES Prosecutors withheld from Clint's attorneys, and the Jury, a “significant activity report” (“SIGACT”) which the US Army created about Clint's engagement with the motorcycle riders and others, just 30 days after the incident. The report stated Clint’s platoon was being "scouted for an impending ambush/attack,” and at least one “insurgent killed-in-action confirmed." In other words, Clint's split-second decision and orders prevented an attack on his platoon and saved his Soldier's lives. 3. WITNESSES NOT HELD ACCOUNTABLE AND ORDERED TO TESTIFY The jury never knew that witnesses against Clint were themselves initially accused of murder, given immunity from prosecution (they would not be held responsible) ... and were ordered to cooperate with prosecutors. 4. PREVIOUS LEADER WOULD NEVER ALLOW MOTORCYCLES NEAR PLATOON The Jury never saw a critical portion of a sworn written statement made by the previous Platoon Leader, who Clint replaced after he was medically evacuated due to peppering shrapnel wounds to the eyes, face, and abdomen in a previous IED attack. Before the statement was disclosed to Clint’s trial defense attorneys, someone had lined out the portion of his statement in which the previous Platoon Leader wrote he would never allow motorcycles to get near his platoon for fear of an explosion – the very reason Clint’s soldier initially fired on the threat, and the very reason Clint gave the order to fire to his overwatch "gun truck."





About The Situation

Was All The Evidence Presented to The Jury?


NO Clint's case was not a trial of all the facts available to the prosecution. 1. CLINT ORDERED THE ENGAGEMENT ON OUR ENEMY, NOT "CIVILIANS" Clint believed he ordered his "gun truck" to engage our enemy. The prosecution said he killed "civilians." After his court-martial, Clint retained a new team of attorneys and investigators who learned that prosecutors did not disclose evicence which would have cleared Clint of any wrong-doing - "biometric data" (fingerprint and DNA evidence). This evidence shows conclusively that Clint's platoon did not kill "civilians," as the prosecution claimed, but rather, they killed enemy bomb-makers who had previously left their fingerprints and skin cells on improvised explosive device (IED) components which killed and maimed U.S. Soldiers on the Afghan battlefield.
2. CLINT'S ORDERS SAVED US LIVES Prosecutors withheld from Clint's attorneys, and the Jury, a “significant activity report” (“SIGACT”) which the U.S. Army created about Clint's engagement with the motorcycle riders and others, just 30 days after the incident. The report stated Clint’s platoon was being "scouted for an impending ambush/attack,” and at least one “insurgent killed-in-action confirmed." In other words, Clint's split-second decision and orders prevented an attack on his platoon and saved his Soldier's lives. 3. WITNESSES NOT HELD ACCOUNTABLE AND ORDERED TO TESTIFY The jury never knew that witnesses against Clint were themselves initially accused of murder, given immunity from prosecution (they would not be held responsible) ... and were ordered to cooperate with prosecutors. 4. PREVIOUS LEADER WOULD NEVER ALLOW MOTORCYCLES NEAR PLATOON The Jury never saw a critical portion of a sworn written statement made by the previous Platoon Leader, who Clint replaced after he was medically evacuated due to peppering shrapnel wounds to the eyes, face, and abdomen in a previous IED attack. Before the statement was disclosed to Clint’s trial defense attorneys, someone had lined out the portion of his statement in which the previous Platoon Leader wrote he would never allow motorcycles to get near his platoon for fear of an explosion – the very reason Clint’s soldier initially fired on the threat, and the very reason Clint gave the order to fire to his overwatch "gun truck."




When & Where Did This Happen?


JULY 2, 2012 IN ZHARI, AFGHANISTAN

The incident occured on July 2, 2012, while Clint was conducting a combat patrol in the Zhari District of Kandahar Province, Afghanistan.

The Paratroopers referred to Zhari as the "Heart of Darkness."





Why Did Clint Give The Order to Shoot?


TO PROTECT HIS SOLDIERS

Clint was concerned for the safety of his Paratroopers.

Clint did not want a know threat, three enemy combatants on a motorcycle near his Paratroopers while they were on patrol. U.S. Troops stationed in Afghanistan as well as teh Afghan Government, knew all too well the Taliban's use of motorcycles to kill Soldiers and civilians. It was a Taliban Tactic, Technicque, and Procedure (TTP).

TO ENGAGE A THREAT

Seconds after PFC Skelton correctly assessed the threat, fired his rifle, and missed, Clint, who was unable to observe the situation, ordered another Paratrooper who was manning a machinegun mounted on a "gun truck," and who could observe the situation, to fire.

CONSISTENT WITH THE ROEs

The initial soldier, PFC Skelton, testified his actions were consistant with the Rules Of Engagement (ROEs) when he fired at the riders on the motorcycle as they were traveling at an excessive rate of speed toward the Paratrooper's patrol.




How Much Time Elapsed Between Shots?


SECONDS

According to five (5) witnesses who testified at Clint's trial, only seconds elapsed between when PFC Skelton shot at, and missed, the motorcycle riders and when Clint radioed the "gun truck," he placed in an overwatch position to protect the platoon, to fire the shots which killed two of the motorcycle riders.




Were The Motorcycle Riders Actions Consistent with Those of the Taliban?


YES

The Taliban routinely uses motorcycles to mount attacks on US Forces, Afghan Government Forces, and civilians.

While their bikes are old, low-powered, and poorly maintained, their expert riders know their way around the goat tracks and dirt roads that cut across mountain ranges and snake through valleys all over the country.

Taliban forces can hastily arrive at an Afghan village, pass intelligence and orders to local fighters, drop off weapons, or plan an attack/ambush. If spotted, they can take off and disburse much faster than US forces can pursue them in our heavy and relatively slow armored vehicles.

From serving as an agile means of transportation for scouts observing and reporting information about the movement and actions of our Warriors to mobile platforms from which the enemy can shoot and move, to using them as Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Devices (VB-IED), i.e., explosive laden motorcycles, which can be used to kill and maim dozens of people, these are all well-known enemy tactics, techniques, and procedure (TTPs).




What Happened?


CLINT WAS WRONGFULLY ACCUSED AFTER MAKING THE RIGHT CALL While leading a combat patrol in Afghanistan, Clint ordered one of his U.S. Paratroopers to fire on what, in Afghanistan, is considered a clear and present threat to the safety of U.S. personnel - three Taliban riding on a motorcycle. One of Clint's U.S. Paratroopers killed two of the three Taliban, the third escaped. This initial action disrupted what was to be what the U.S. Army claimed would have been an "ambush/attack" on Clint's Paratroopers. However, instead of being commended for making the right call, based upon all three of the Taliban on the motorcycle being mistakenly identified as "civilians," Clint was held accountable for two counts of "murder' and one count of "attempted murder." If you haven't already, please click here to review a more detailed "Summary."




How Much of a Threat Are Motorcycles in Afghanistan?


MOTORCYCLES IN AFGHANISTAN POSE A VERY DEADLY THREAT

According the to the New York Times, in 2015, a suicide bomber riding a motorcycle was even responsible for "one of the deadliest attacks against American forces in Afghanistan..." (click for article)

SIMILAR INCIDENT, DIFFERENT ENDING

A suicide bomber riding a motorcycle loaded with explosives crashed into an US Air Force security foot patrol in a village near Bagram Air Base. Six American Service Members were killed with two other Americans and an Afghan injured. (click for article)


Unlike in Clint's situation, where no US Paratroopers were injured, not one of Air Force personnel fired their weapon at the rider on the motorcycle.

UNITED NATION'S REPORTS

Regarding IED activity in Afghanistan, a United Nations (UN) report noted, on 14 August, barely a month after Clint's incident, an "IED rigged to a motorbike" detonated in a busy square, killing 12 civilians including two girls and injuring 22. (click for report)

In 2012, the UN documented 1,507 civilian casualties (328 killed and 1,179 injured) from 73 incidents of suicide and complex attacks -- They define a ‘complex attack’ as a deliberate and coordinated attack which includes a suicide device (i.e. body-born IED, VBIED), more than one attacker and more than one type of device (i.e. body-born IED + mortars). (click for report)

In the UN's 2013 Mid-Year Report, they observed the Taliban's extensive use motorcycles to conduct targeted killings even prompted local governments in Afghanistan to ban the use of motorcycles. The Taliban were so upset by the bans they attacked and shut down schools in one province in April of 2012 and another province in May 2013 (click for report)

OTHER EXAMPLES

1. CNN Reports, "ISIS militant bomber on motorbike kills 33 at bank in Afghanistan" (click for more)

2. Associated Press Reports, "...a double suicide bombing that killed at least 25 people... in Kabul, Afghanistan... Police say the first bomber was on a motorcycle..." (click for more)


3. Reuters Reports, "... bomb planted in a motorbike killed at least eight civilians and wounded another 18 in a crowded market..." (click for more)





How Deadly For U.S. Personnel Was July 2012 in Afghanistan?


JULY 2012 WAS ONE OF THE DEADLIEST MONTHS IN AFGHANISTAN

July was one of the the deadliest for US Troops deployed to Afghanistan in 2012, with 40 US Servicemen killed (May 2012 also saw fourty servicemen killed).

July's casualties also made 2012 the fourth deadliest year of the war with 197 US Military fatalities... with five more months still left in the year. Of the total 1,954 deaths, 1,385 (71%) occurred in the previous three and a half years since President Barack Obama was inaugurated on Jan. 20, 2009.

Clint and his Paratroopers were aware of this and realized, historically, the Afghan summer months of June to September are when most of the heavy fighting takes place and thus most of the U.S. military casualties occur.


Homemade bombs, formally known as Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), were the most widely used weapons by insurgents against US-led coalition forces; IEDs were responsible for over half the American military deaths in 2012 and throughout the war.

In July 2012 alone, insurgents used IEDs to kill 20 U.S. soldiers, which is 50% of all fatalities that month with the southern province of Kandahar continuing to be one of the deadliest for U.S. forces.

(click for more details from CNSNews.com’s detailed database of U.S. military fatalities in the Afghanistan war which is sourced by official Department of Defense (DOD) casualty reports enhanced by information taken from the U.S.-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) and media accounts).




Why Do Paratroopers Refer to Zhari as the "Heart of Darkness?"


THE "HEART OF DARKNESS"

Zhari wes referred to as the "Heart of Darkness" by the US Paratroopers who deployed there because it is the "birthplace" of the Taliban (violent Islamist terrorists) and because of the high amount of casualties the US personnel sustained while there.


IMPROVISED EXPLOSIVED DEVICES (IEDs)

Clint and his Paratroopers knew 75% of Taliban bomb makers in Kandahar were identified in Zhari.

From 2007 to 2014, US Servicemen were subjected to 2,630 blasts from Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) in Kandahar Province, 30% of those occured in Zhari.

From March to August of 2012, the U.S. Army suffered 16 Soldiers Killed-In-Action (KIAs) and dozens of Soldiers Wounded-In-Action (WIAs) in Zhari.

30 days prior to Clint's incident on July 2, 2012, there were 28 IED blasts in Zhari District, nearly one every day. Some days, there were two or three IED blasts.

Clint and his Paratroopers were fully aware of this.

(click for more)




Might Politics & Other Events Impacted Clint’s Case?


YES - IT IS QUITE LIKELY POLITICS & OTHER EVENTS OVERSHADOWED CLINT'S CASE

HIGH-LEVEL POLITICAL NEGOTIATIONS

There were significant foreign policy negotiations taking place between Afghanistan and the United States around the time leading up to Clint’s incident in 2012, during the subsequent trial in 2013, and beyond.

On March 11, 2012, a U.S. Army Soldier with a different unit allegedly killed 16 Afghan civilians in Kandahar, Afghanistan, and was charged with murder. Some referred to the incident as the “Kandahar Massacre.”

On April 22, 2012, after more than a year and a half of negotiations, Afghanistan and the United States finalized the draft text for the "Enduring Strategic Partnership Agreement between Afghanistan and the United States" (SPA), which laid out the framework for a future U.S. role in Afghanistan.

The SPA was critical as Afghanistan was, and remains, an important partner in the fight against terrorism, working with the U.S. to destroy al-Qaeda, ISIS-K (ISIS-Khorasan is the portion of ISIS which is active in Afghanistan and Pakistan) and their affiliates.

On May 1, 2012, Afghan President Karzai and U.S. President Obama signed the SPA. However, the Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA), another very important agreement, which had been in place since 2003, was being renegotiated.

The SOFAs establishes the framework under which U.S. military personnel operate in a foreign country and how the domestic laws apply toward U.S. personnel. The main issue of concern is which country exercises criminal jurisdiction over U.S. personnel

According to the SOFA in Afghanistan established in 2003, U.S. personnel were immune from criminal prosecution by Afghan authorities. Thus, the U.S. would have jurisdiction over the prosecution of U.S. Service Members who allegedly committed murder or other serious crimes.

However, the alleged deadly attack on Afghan civilians by a U.S. Service Member in March placed tremendous political pressure on the SOFA discussions being held between the U.S. and Afghanistan and who would govern whether Afghan law would apply in addressing such situations.

On July 02, 2012, Clint’s incident occurred in which it was alleged yet another U.S. servicemember killed Afghan civilians.

The manner in which the U.S. would address these two incidents would impact the extremely important on-going bilateral negotiations and the renegotiation of the SOFA.

Some have suggested, due to the tense political climate, Clint would have been found guilty of murder and placed in prison, regardless of the evidence.





About The Future

Should the President Pardon Clint or a Court Reverse the Conviction?


YES Based upon all of the evidence which was not presented to both the defense and the Jury, Clint should receive commutation, clemency, or a pardon from the President of the United States or a Federal Court should reverse the Conviction. Several of our Nation's Warriors have been convicted and imprisoned for crimes in combat where the military appellate process has been inadequate to resolve fully and fairly their Constitutional claims. Were it not for habeas review or action by the President, their eventual release would be left to the will of the very authority that may have unlawfully confined them in the first place. In fact, even if a military prisoner seeks direct access to the President of the United States for a commutation, clemency, or a pardon, pursuant to Article II of the Constitution, the Justice Department’s Office of the Pardon Attorney will not process the request for action; rather, in a disturbingly circular fashion, the Office of the Pardon Attorney will return the case to the same branch of the military that imprisoned the applicant. This demonstrates the need for federal civilian courts to grant relief or the President to act. The following is and e-mail dated June 29, 2018, from William Taylor II, Executive Officer, Office of the Pardon Attorney, U.S. Department of Justice; This is in response to your follow up email from earlier today inquiring further about the Department’s policy with regard to military commutation requests. Please take a moment to review our longstanding policy on the subject at https://www.justice.gov/pardon/policies# The response you received earlier today was accurate because we do not handle or accept petitions on behalf of individuals wishing to seek commutation of sentence for a military conviction. That is outside of the scope of our mission and that is best response I can provide.




Where is Clint Now?


PRISON

Clint has been dismissed from the US Army and is presently in prison in the United States Disciplinary Barracks (USDB) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

He has been there for the past 5 years and has another 14 years to serve.




How Can I Help?


1. READ You can visit www.freeclintlorance.com and read the actual court papers. 2. WRITE

You can write your Congressman and Senator to request a Presidential Pardon.

Not sure of your Congressional Representatives?

Click here to identify your Congressman/woman.

Click here to identify your Senator.

3. VOLUNTEER

4. DONATE





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